In this issue:

UNDERSTANDING THE CULTURE OF SULU
LAST CHANCE TO SEE BEYOND THE CURRENTS
FROM OUR BOOKS & GIFTS CORNER:
SPACE AND IDENTITY
IN FOCUS:
MAGSAYSAY-HO'S THREE WOMEN WITH BASKETS
BROOK ANDREW: EYE TO EYE EXTENDED
COMING SOON:
MUKHANG TSINOY
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UNDERSTANDING THE CULTURE OF SULU

Tausug leader, 1913
Museum Lobby
September 20, Saturday, 2 - 5 p.m.


The Sulu archipelago is proud of its history of power and colorful culture. Sulu was an international trade hub during the 18th and 19th centuries, bridging European colonizers and Southeast Asia to the Philippines and China. At its peak, the Sulu Sultanate controlled vast territories, including parts of Indonesia, Borneo, and Palawan. Foreign powers not only traded or waged wars with Sulu, but treated them with utmost respect through the many treaties Sulu signed with the Spanish, British, French, and other sovereigns.

To complement the closing of the exhibit Beyond the Currents: The Culture and Power of Sulu, the museum will host an afternoon of lectures on a kingdom described as embodying "the highest stage of civilization to which the Malays ever attained." Topics and speakers include:

  • Sustaining Sulu People's Identity of Power, History and Culture through their Visual Arts
    Abraham Sakili, UP art studies professor and guest curator
  • Dance & Power CrossCurrents
    Ligaya Fernando-Amilbangsa, dance scholar and teacher
  • Sulu: Their Historical Implications on the Moro Quest for Self-Determination
    Mehol Sadain, Former dean of UP Institute of Islamic Studies
  • Sulu Power: Contexts and Dynamics
    Julkipli Wadi, UP Institute of Islamic Studies professor
Lecture fee is P100. Reservations are highly recommended. For reservations and details, call Elma Abrina at 889-1234 or e-mail [email protected]

LAST CHANCE TO SEE BEYOND THE CURRENTS

Silver mamaan
(betel nut box)
Cone Room and Dragon Gallery
Ongoing until September 24


"Satisfies our thirst for knowledge about the Sultanate of Sulu well beyond usual expectations."
— BusinessMirror

Be sure not to miss Beyond the Currents: The Culture and Power of Sulu, which closes on September 24. The spectacular exhibit presents a different side of Sulu—as the heart of a trade zone, a market center, and a regional power. The exhibit also tells the story of power wielded over European expansion and commerce in an era when Chinese trade was highly profitable. Archival photographs, prints, ceramics, maps, jewelry, and textiles serve as testimony to Sulu's power. Rare Tausug suits of armor and weapons of defense further highlight the strength of the Sultanate.

FROM OUR BOOKS & GIFTS CORNER:
SPACE AND IDENTITY
By Abraham Sakili
Published by Asian Center, University of the Philippines

18 x 23 cm, 275 pages, Full color

P1,500 for Hardbound
P1,000 for Softbound


For the Muslims, there is no such thing as "empty space." Space is something that is always filled, even when it seems empty. Far from being a void or a negative entity, space is a dynamic and positive reality, a force central to Muslim Filipino culture.

Space and Identity: Expressions in the Arts, Culture, and Society of the Muslims in the Philippines is a cultural study of space—a study of arts in Muslim space, and a study of space in the culture, arts, and society of Philippine Muslims. In this book, Sulu-born Sakili uses the concept of space in the culture of Mindanao Muslims as reference point of their visual arts, architecture, and culture. This much awaited book on Muslim art also draws its value from Sakili being an artist, painter, and illustrator of Islamic motifs. His artistry finds evidence in the book's rich documentation of the arts and culture of Muslims in the Philippines.

Visit our shop at the museum lobby or call us at 889-1234 for more titles.

IN FOCUS:
MAGSAYSAY-HO'S THREE WOMEN WITH BASKETS


Three Women with Baskets, Anita Magsaysay-Ho (b. 1914), 1970, Oil on canvas, 55.9 x 91.4 cm.


Women make up the first and dominant subject of Anita Magsaysay-Ho, one of the country's senior modernists and foremost women artists. In her paintings, women—whether working in the fields, winnowing grain, pulling nets at sea, catching chickens, or tending birds—interact with one another in a universal sisterhood.

Three Women with Baskets was made when the artist and her family settled in Canada in the late 1960s. Magsaysay-Ho returned to her painting but, by this time, had forsaken the demanding ways of egg tempera for the more user-friendly oil paint. She was partial to warm sienna tones for many of her oils. Her themes continued as before: barefoot women clad in long skirts and white blouses, white bandanas shrouding their heads.

This Magsaysay-Ho painting is just a few of the works in the Yuchengco Museum's permanent collection. Three Women with Baskets is on view at the Alcove Gallery, which currently showcases the range of approaches to female forms and roles in the exhibit Women in Poetry and Form.

BROOK ANDREW: EYE TO EYE EXTENDED

I split your gaze
Bridgeway Gallery and Foyer
Ongoing until September 24


Visitors now have three more weeks to see Brook Andrew: Eye to Eye, which features the works of indigenous Australian artist Brook Andrew. This striking display of neon installations, photographic studies, prints, and sculpture has been extended through September 24, Wednesday. The exhibit will then fly to Singapore in October.

COMING SOON:
MUKHANG TSINOY

Portrait of Mrs. Henry
Uy Cho Yee
Ancestral worship is a time-honored tradition of the Filipino-Chinese. At Tsinoy homes, portraits of loved ones are placed above altars in Taoist, Buddhist, or Christian forms. Ancestors are honored by praying, burning incense, offering food, and burning paper money. The placement of portraits in such altars suggests that Tsinoy families commissioned portraits of themselves and their loved ones as part of their beliefs or filial duty, and not for decor or ego alone.

Mukhang Tsinoy: Portaits by Fernando Amorsolo will showcase a number of Amorsolo portraits of Filipino-Chinese families, some of which have never been shown to the public. Opening on October 1, the exhibit is inspired by several main pieces in the museum's collection: a large double portrait of Enrique and Maria Yuchengco by "Botong" Francisco, which used to hang at the family mausoleum, and portraits of the couple by Amorsolo.

Mukhang Tsinoy is the Yuchengco Museum's contribution to the seven-museum Amorsolo retrospective, His Art, Our Heart.


This e-newsletter has been sent by
Yuchengco Museum
RCBC Plaza, Corner Ayala & Sen. Gil J. Puyat Avenues
Makati City, Philippines 1200
Tel: (632) 889-1234 | E-mail: [email protected]